Author Archives: davidgroen1

A Yom Kippur message: A better world starts within ourselves, not by blaming others.

As almost everyone Jewish, and many non-Jewish people know, the holiday of Yom Kippur is rapidly approaching. This Sunday night when this solemn day begins, Jews all over the world will celebrate in whatever fashion they deem most appropriate to them. I wanted to speak to a theme that was different than most of the themes of the day, and somewhat unfortunately I found it to be a very easy thing to do. The theme I wish to focus on is that of personal responsibility.

Please don’t get me wrong. I am not by any means saying that there is a mass neglect of individual accountability. For me to do so would not only be overly judgmental, it would be contrary to the theme of this piece. For if I am to make the point I wish to make, it is very simple to do so. All I need to do is look to myself first and foremost.

We live in a world where people are not only prone to finding blame, they are obsessed with it. In so many of the discussions we have nowadays, finding culpability in what ails our communities, countries and planet seems to be our number one priority. The tendency to do so is so great here in America that it has begun to resemble the beginnings of an actual Civil War. But I present the following question. Are we correct for assigning blame to those we find responsible for the problems we’re exposed to on almost a daily basis? Well the truth is that we have every right as human beings to use our cognitive abilities and moral compasses to reach conclusions and take whatever action we feel can be helpful in bettering our world. That being said, as Yom Kippur approaches, I for one realize that there is only one place to start this process ethically and honestly. That is by looking first to myself and my own behaviors and actions.

The reality is that if our priorities were to look at ourselves first we would be collectively much better off than we are today. Again, since I want to maintain some semblance of credibility I will look only to myself and mention those things I feel I must focus on before I look to change anyone else. For me personally, my strong belief in God helps to keep me humble. That being said, it’s far too easy for someone to be pleased with themselves, and I for one know that I will concentrate on having a greater amount of humility. My personal belief that God is the boss, so to speak, is enough of a basis for me to realize that ultimately the power does not lie with me.

I will do my best to be better to my fellow human being. Not just those who are like me, be it religiously, racially or philosophically, but all my fellow human beings. On Sunday night until Monday evening I will spend much, if not the majority of the day making my plea to God that I will be forgiven for those actions I’ve done wrong and for anything I have done to hurt others. Imagine the greatness of a world in which everyone tried to improve on that issue alone. I will watch my words. I will make every attempt to use my voice to say things that are positive and helpful, and use as little of my time speaking ill of others, something that always breathes life into negativity.

I will do my best to give of my time and effort to those who need my help. If I am not qualified to do so based on lack of qualifications, I will do my best to improve upon my qualities and work towards being someone who can make more of a difference in the future than I do today.

Lastly, I will look to set a good example. While I do not know if I will always succeed in doing so, partially because so many of us have varying opinions, I begin today by setting the example of looking to myself rather than to someone else in regard to what needs improvement. If we all looked to ourselves first we might just find we have much less time to blame others for everything we feel is wrong, and with any luck we will help others do the same. If we want a better world, we need to start by bettering our personal worlds, something we can only do that by bettering ourselves.

For anyone I did wrong or for anyone I caused any pain in the past year I ask your forgiveness, and I wish that we all see a healthy, safe, productive and happy year ahead.

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Open Letter to Desean Jackson in response to his anti-Semitic comments

DJDear Desean,

As a son of Holocaust survivors and a defender of the Jewish people I feel it is my obligation to address your recent comments. The initial quote, which you were happy to credit to Adolf Hitler, read as follows:

“(They) will extort America,” the quote read, “(and) their plan for world domination won’t work if the Negroes know who they were.”

You went on to indicate that you have great admiration for the Reverend Louis Farrakhan. Louis Farrakhan, the man who has referred to Judaism as “a deceptive lie and theological error”. To be frank, those are some of the nicest things he has said about my people. In a response to be called out for his anti-Semitism he replied, “When they talk about Farrakhan, call me a hater, you know how they do – call me an anti-Semite. Stop it, I’m anti-termite!”  He also once said, “I don’t care what they put on me. The government is my enemy, the powerful Jews are my enemy.”  And while I can go on for many pages, I leave you with one more.“Do you know that in Europe in every nation where they were, they led an industry in commerce in trade in banking? And the gentiles were angry with them because everywhere they went, they ruled. So the gentiles rose up against the Jews and persecuted them in Europe.” 

This is the man you said you have great admiration for, right around the same time that you made your initial anti-Semitic statement.  It has been suggested to me that your statement is based on nothing more than stupidity. In order to determine whether or not I believed that to be the case I decided to read some of your additional Twitter comments.  What I found were highly intelligent, often self-promoting comments from someone who clearly is very aware of what he is saying. I believe your statements to neither be ambiguous nor reticent.  On the contrary, you know how you feel and you are very comfortable sharing it with others, as is your right in the United States of America,  However, I too have a right to tell you how I feel, and therefore I ask you.  If you were in my position would you be satisfied merely because you apologized?

I do not remember a time in my life when I did not know about what the Jewish people went through during the reign of Hitler.  More specifically, I always knew what happened to my family, and as I got older I learned what my parents dealt with when they were at the same age as you were when you were catching footballs and living a great lifestyle with the money paid to you by none other than yes, your Jewish employer.  For 5 years  the Nazis occupied my parents native Holland. My father worked with the resistance but had to flee his neighborhood to survive, always on the run and never certain if he would live to see another day. My mother had to move from hiding place to hiding place knowing that if she were ever to be caught by the Germans, death would be welcome after what they would likely do to her.  She would sleep underground in what she said felt like a coffin for 16 months.  When the war ended my father would learn that his mother, father, sister and brother-in law were murdered by the Nazis and my mother would learn of the same fate befalling her father and brother.  Not to mention the additional relatives and friends they would never see again.  6 million Jews were murdered by the Nazis.  There were countless accounts of torture, medical experimentation, rape and beatings. And Desean, this goes back a mere 75 years. So I ask you again, would you be OK with what you said if you were in my shoes? Would you be so quick to accept an apology?

Let me offer a quote to you, from none other than the great poet and civil rights icon Maya Angelou.

When someone show you who they are, believe them the first time.

I do not accept your apology, nor will I till I hear you denounce the anti-Semitic comments made by the man you admire so much, Louis Farrakhan. When you do that, I will be willing to accept that you are truly sorry for your comments. Until that time I will see your apology as just a way to make sure you continue getting a very nice paycheck, signed by none other than the Jewish owner of the team you play for.

Sincerely,

David Groen

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Operation Solomon: How Israel showed what a nation does when black lives really matter, long before people here marched in the streets

I have often said that the biggest problem in the world is how many people truly do not value human life. I urge you to watch this video to see what happens when a nation and its people truly value human life.

In May of 1991 the government of the State of Israel, the nation incorrectly called an Apartheid state and often slandered as a racist and white supremacist country, saved over 14,000 Jews from the African nation of Ethiopia.  This wasn’t lip service, political opportunism or anarchy. This was a government showing what you do when at the very core of your values is that black lives matter because every life matters.  Watch this video and either remember this great story or learn something you need to know, that it was the Jewish nation showed that black lives matter long before it became a movement in America.  Here is a little piece of history to throw into the faces of those that unfairly categorize Israel.

 

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Holland’s Heroes presents: It’s Friday. You’re Welcome! This week, it’s on Thursday!

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I have never been one to overly sell the merits of the Jewish way of life.  I choose to leave that up to those far more qualified.  However, as someone who observes Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath, I and my fellow Jews occasionally have an advantage during this time that others might not. Since Shabbat starts on Friday at sundown, unlike many who during this unprecedented time find one day after another blending into each other, we always need to know when it’s Friday.  With that in mind Holland’s Heroes will do its best to provide you with a weekly post with the intention of inspiring you, encouraging you, and bringing some joy to the many faces looking for reasons to smile.

As it is the holiday of Shavuot starting at sundown tonight, this week’s segment of, It’s Friday. You’re welcome!, falls out on Thursday.  This week I just want to take a moment to thank the people in my wonderful community who are such tremendous friends.  To say I am spoiled is an understatement, as I see my big problem today being how to fit all the delicious food I will be treated to into my refrigerator.  Clearly a blessing poorly disguised as a problem.

And then there’s this. As a single man, I am generally the guy giving flowers, not getting them.  The last time I received flowers from someone was 3 years ago, after my mother died, when a young woman who I am friends with, an employee at the local Trader Joe’s,  bought me flowers to express her support for me during my loss. Today the Rabbi of our Young Israel, Rabbi Jonathan Muskat, together with his wife Yael, put together a package that included, among other things, these beautiful flowers.  The sentiment behind this is so loving and thoughtful that it is one more reason to believe in the human race, even when surrounded by reasons to question that belief.

Thank you to all of you and Chag Sameach,

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Today the Jewish people celebrate the first set of guidelines

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In the midst of a pandemic we are making decisions of how we live our lives and move forward with the help of a set of guidelines.  Our leaders are telling us what we need to do to not only live a longer healthier life, but how we need to interact around people, what might help us avoid problems in the future, and what we need to do to take into consideration the needs of others.  We are strongly urged to follow these guidelines.  Some institutions are making them mandatory. Some people are getting mad at others who don’t follow them, while others are attempting to shame people into interpreting them in a like-minded fashion.  In the end people make their choices, sometimes standing alone in their choice, often standing with others.  Sound familiar? It should. It’s the tale as old as time. And starting at sundown tonight, the Jewish people commemorate when it all began.

Shavuot is the holiday in which the Jews celebrate the giving of the law at Mt. Sinai. As Jews we call this the Torah, but in the eyes of many outside of Orthodox Judaism this is when God gave Moses the 10 commandments.  The more expanded understanding in traditional Orthodox Judaism is that all law was given by God at the mountain and that subsequently Rabbinical authorities have interpreted it as to how it applies in day to day life.  Regardless of what you believe was given by God to Moses on this day, what we do know is that from this original set of guidelines entire religious groups were formed, whether it was different branches of Judaism or Christianity, which as we all know began with a group of Jewish people with their own specific account and interpretation of events.

Those who started from the premise that something really did happen on Mt. Sinai have chosen to either base their life, or in some ways structure their lives around some element of these guidelines.  Many feel that following as many decrees put forth by their religious leaders as possible gets them closer to the precise account of the day, while others feel the basic 10 commandments, and even more precisely the 10 commandments speaking to human behavior towards their fellow human being is closest to the original intent.

When all is said and done, each person makes their own choice.  Granted some are born into it and surrounded by it with such intensity that changing direction is anywhere between hard and unlikely, but they have that choice nonetheless. And guess what? There is nothing wrong with that, since if their is one axiom we generally agree on, at least as Jews, is that everyone has free will.

So as some struggle with the concept of guidelines and actions that impact their daily lives, look back and realize that to many, that is what man has always been encouraged, some might say even obligated to do, regardless of whether they like it or not.  But subsequently we need to also remember that it is not our place to judge their choice.  It never was and never will be.

Wishing all my Jewish friends a wonderful, healthy, and meaningful Shavuot and to all of you, happiness and peace.

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Memorial Day: A gift to the American people

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I am someone who always thanks a veteran or current member of the military.  Over the years, when using the very unoriginal line “thank you for your service”, I have often been struck by the gratitude given back to me, merely for saying these 5 words.  A quick tangent away from the point I am about to make.  I sat down intending to write an entirely different piece, but when I remembered how often someone thanked me for taking 5 seconds out of my day to say thank you to them, I realized there was a far more important message to send on this Memorial Day.

There have been people who have suffered terrible losses in the past few months.  There are those who are struggling economically, physically or mentally. There is no way of measuring whose suffering is worse nor is there a way of determining whose perspective is good and whose is bad.  But there is no question that there are those among us that would be well served by not only realizing how good they have it, but maybe more importantly showing empathy towards those whose suffering is far greater.  How does one do that? Well I speak from personal experience when I say, one very important way is to focus on others more than yourself.

True sacrifice has a ripple effect.  While we remember soldiers lost in defense of our nation, we need to acknowledge the families that will always feel their loss, and in many cases suffer real hardships as a result.  We need to look past the big story of the day and remember that long after our lives return as much as possible to normal, there will still be children, spouses, parents, relatives and friends who have mourned the loss of a soldier before we were stuck at home, and will continue to do so long after.

There may be far greater repercussions from the crisis we currently face, but if Memorial Day teaches us anything, it’s that you don’t count casualties before the next battle ensues.  When FDR said his famous words at his inaugural in 1933, “nothing to fear but fear itself”, the words rang true with many then, as they still do today.

The first 2 sentences of President Roosevelt’s address reads as follows:

So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory.

Nothing about this piece is intended to be political, so much so that if someone makes it so, they will be missing the entire point. That point being the responsibility of each and every one of us as individuals to step forward in whatever way that we can.

Memorial Day is a gift to the American people.  To acknowledge those that made the ultimate sacrifice so that we could live in safety and peace, besides being an honor to their lost souls, and we pray a comfort to their loved ones, is also a potential for all of us to gain strength and character.  To have the opportunity to look beyond ourselves and focus on another’s pain and hardship has the potential to separate many from the self-indulgence that helps neither themselves nor anyone else.   To recognize what someone else gave up for our freedom will hopefully lead us to the understanding of how fortunate most of us are to have the freedom and ability to make our lives better. The gift of Memorial Day is the reminder of how to think about others before we think about ourselves, and to do so may be the greatest honor we can bestow on those who have fallen so that we can live in safety and freedom.

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Holland’s Heroes presents: It’s Friday. You’re Welcome! This week, it’s Batman!

Batman-Visit3

I have never been one to overly sell the merits of the Jewish way of life.  I choose to leave that up to those far more qualified.  However, as someone who observes Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath, I and my fellow Jews occasionally have an advantage during this time that others might not. Since Shabbat starts on Friday at sundown, unlike many who during this unprecedented time find one day after another blending into each other, we always need to know when it’s Friday.  With that in mind Holland’s Heroes will do its best to provide you with a weekly post with the intention of inspiring you, encouraging you, and bringing some joy to the many faces looking for reasons to smile.

Today I share with you the story of a real life superhero. Our very own Batman.

A few weeks ago I had a very minor and truly unimportant debate with one of my brothers. The question posed was, who is the best Batman?  While he believes it to be Christian Bale, I personally have always been partial to Michael Keaton.  Since that conversation however, there is a new Batman in the mix, and his name is Josh Aryeh.

Josh, whose brother is a friend of mine from the neighborhood, is a living example of what is good in this world.  Those of you who read my posts know that since the start of the pandemic most of what I have written is positive, supportive and encouraging. We live in tough times, and I have said on numerous occasions that what we need now more than ever is to find ways in which we can help people around us. If we help just one person we are still accomplishing more than getting into a silly verbal spat on social media in which we think we are proving our intelligence and worth.  I’ve been encouraged to see how many ordinary people have done good during this time, many of them I look up to in awe of their strength and kindness.  But to this day I had not yet come across an actual superhero, until I heard about Josh Aryeh.

It started a number of years ago, when, as an owner of a Lamborghini, Josh was asked if he could give a ride to an 8 year old cancer patient. The young girl, who had been suffering with the disease since the age of 4, had a dream of driving in a  Lamborghini.  Josh was able to make this young girl’s dream come true, bringing joy to a child who had known little to none in her life.  The feeling Josh felt at that time had such a profound impact on him that he knew he wanted to continue to find ways to do good in the years that would follow.  He continued his charitable efforts, going above and beyond what most ever do, but it wasn’t till he took it to the next level that he reached superhero status.

After investing into altering his car into a real life Batmobile, Josh put together a group of people with cars of a similar exotic nature, and together with the NYPD and Nassau County Police Department began something truly wonderful.  Josh created the charitable organization known as Smiles through Cars.  Together with his crew of fellow exotic car and motorcycle enthusiasts, Josh leads the vehicles in a procession past the homes of children whose lives have been impacted through illness or other circumstances that are of no fault of their own. Josh’s actions, together with the special people he’s recruited are bringing immense happiness to these children, cheated out of so much of the joy so many of us take for granted. During a time when we have been kept apart by a highly contagious virus, the need for this has been even greater, and rather than being slowed down by quarantines and guidelines, Josh, excuse me, Batman and his crew have stepped up their efforts to help any way that they can.

I urge you to learn more about this incredible act of kindness by reading the following article, BATMAN SAVES THE DAY VIA THE SMILES THROUGH CARS CHARITY!

There are many decent and good people out there.  I’ve seen and personally experienced some of this goodness since the pandemic began.  Much of it has truly been inspiring and heartwarming.  Josh’s story however, is the stuff legends are made of, and next time someone asks me who I think the best Batman is, I’ll very likely say Josh Aryeh.

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Open Letter to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

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Dear Mayor de Blasio,

As someone who has focused on expressing myself during this crisis almost exclusively through positive words of hope and encouragement, I have refrained from publicly expressing my thoughts regarding your job performance.  I’ve been one to take the approach that negativity does nothing for anyone, that my personal responsibility is to look for ways to help, and when I don’t find those opportunities I should only speak to those things positive.  However, your incompetence, partially based on what appears to be a biased focus, often against New York’s Jewish community has finally compelled me to speak up.

This is not a letter motivated by anything political. In fact, I find the most agreed upon non-partisan opinion in New York is the subject of your job performance.   As a New Yorker I felt gratitude for the daily updates we were receiving from both the President as well  New York’s governor in the earlier days of the pandemic. While each political side will attack the other and find fault in the actions of both of those men, I choose to take the position that they have both worked hard to protect those for whom they are responsible.  Furthermore I believe that when applying our judgments as to where they may have made mistakes,  we need to take into account that no one in the world had any experience in dealing with this type of situation.  However, as Mayor of New York, your inept performance during this pandemic has been so glaring, it has contributed greatly to the devastation the city has faced.

Although I am someone who agrees with making the use of marijuana one’s personal choice, when various sources over the years have indicated that you spend many, if not most of your mornings getting stoned, I doubt that is helpful in your abilities to handle a crisis of this magnitude.  Where were your actions in managing transportation at the onset of the spread? I know that essential workers need to travel to get to their places of employment, but did you make any attempt to structure a safer way to ride the subway?  Did you provide any alternative methods of transport?  I lived in the borough of Queens for around 25 years of my life, and knowing how subway travel is done through the borough, without a mayor taking some action, thousands upon thousands of people had to have traveled daily in what was clearly a petri dish. And on March 15th, 3 days after travel from Europe was shut down, you encouraged New Yorkers to go for one last drink. Well done Mr. Mayor, I am fairly confident that for some of those people it surely was one last drink.

I’ve seen you look panicky in news conferences, regularly assign blame to others, and contradict directives coming from Governor Cuomo’s office.  But when all else fails, I’ve seen you go back to the well for that one thing that really gets you going.  That favored activity of yours, the blaming and attacking of Orthodox Jews.  When the governor was asked about the gatherings in ultra-Orthodox neighborhoods, his response was that he found any large gathering to be unfortunate and dangerous and that he had spoken to the leaders of the various communities.  What did you do? You singled out the Jewish community.  You even made sure to run over personally to one of the gatherings. And apparently you are now opposing the governor once again on allowing places of worship, primarily Jewish places of worship to open up with guidelines.  Neither I, nor anyone I know outside of those specific communities have supported the large gatherings, however as Mayor of all of New York City, for you to target one group over any other shows a clear disdain for that specific group.  And what may very well be the most important point I make in this letter, is that had your criticism of those Jewish communities been consistent with a tough, hard-working non biased approach, I would have no legitimate criticism.  Instead it was more in line with a lazy approach and thought process based on hindsight, bias and the blaming of others.

Regardless of whether or not one loves or hates him today, Rudy Giuliani guided New York through post 9/11 in Churchillian fashion. I would say you have guided New York through the Coronavirus crisis more like Bozo the Clown, but that would be unfair to Bozo.  If the New York City we have known and loved falls as a result of what has taken place, that above all else will be what shapes your legacy.  Not only have you been a disgrace, but you continue to find ways to compound your errors on a regular basis.  The next best thing that will happen to New York City is when it gets a new mayor. I just hope that by the time that happens it won’t be too late.

Sincerely,

David Groen

 


Michael Moore’s contribution to the current crisis: Bash Israel

Michael Moore’s characteristically predictable hateful and ignorant comment about Israel and my response on Twitter

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Holland’s Heroes presents: It’s Friday. You’re Welcome!

This week I dedicate this post to the memory of Belle Brodsky, Baila bas Raisa. Belle Brodsky,  who recently passed away, is the mother of my friend Ken. Below you will find the beautiful tribute written by Ken’s niece and Belle’s granddaughter Samantha.
But first I offer you this wonderful video made by Israeli comic, Yonatan Gruber.  Appropriate because while it will make you laugh and warm your heart, at the core of it is a son’s love for his mother and very appropriate to this post.
 

 

Ma’s Biography

Belle Brodsky, or Ma as she was known to most all of us, was a force of nature. There was something about her spirit that seemed indestructible. We all like to think it was due in part to Baba, Zeyde and Pa looking over her from the world beyond. Most of all, Hashem, looked favorably upon her – in many ways.

Ma was born in November 1925 in Philadelphia, in the historically Jewish neighborhood of Strawberry Mansion. In all honesty, the exact date of her birth sometimes came into question. Ma couldn’t be bothered with minor details like that. We liked to celebrate on Thanksgiving Day so Ma could have the best kind of birthday one could ask for – to be surrounded by family.

Her parents, Samuel and Rose, were known to us as Baba and Zeyde. Baba was born in Kiev, Ukraine and if you asked Zeyde where he was from he would reply “Camden, New Jersey” in a thick Polish accent. They had three children, Irvie, Paulie and our beloved Belle. They grew up of modest means. Zeyde was a butcher and Baba was busy raising their family in a Yiddishe home. Her brother Irvie owned a dry cleaner’s in Ardmore and Paulie was a veteran in the army. Unfortunately, she lost both of her brothers relatively early – in their forties and fifties. Later in their years, Ma took great, loving care of her parents. She brought groceries to them on a daily basis. A symbol of fierce FEIRCE, limitless devotion. This served as a model to her children. When she wasn’t tending to her own parents, Ma was dedicating the rest of her energy to her children, driving twice daily to Annie’s school to bring her whatever she needed. It was important to her to raise a family to its highest potential. Together with her husband, they sent their three children (Andrea, Lisa and Kenneth) through school, religious school, through college and professional degrees. Her children brought her great nachas growing up to serve others as a teacher, dentist and lawyer. These are oversimplified descriptors of their accomplishments.

Her companion in life, was Leo (BDE), and known to us as Pa. He was born in Leipzig, Germany in 1917. He was the only member of his family to survive the Holocaust. To say he was dealt a difficult set of cards would be an understatement. When Pa saw Ma they were four on a blind double date. Pa ditched his own date because he knew Ma was the person he wanted to be with. Ma’s personality stole the show. It always did.

Her grandchildren Michelle, Paula, Samantha and Jonathan spent many hours on Ma’s couch, our family’s gold standard of comfort and home. Ma had the blessing of being able to meet two greatgrandchildren – Noah and Sophia. At one point in time, all four generations were together in one room.

To sum up Ma’s personality in words would be a disservice to her vibrant neshama. Words are only 2-dimensional and hers were larger than life. Ma was wise. She was intelligent and had profound perspective on what was truly important in life. She showed us what it meant to be generous. Handing out tips to unsuspecting recipients was natural for her. Yiddish phrases would pepper her sentences sometimes ending in a burst of laughter. She could had been a damn comedian and managed to keep herself laughing for 94 years. Her memory was bulletproof. She had essentially had a cult following. If you were to go down the shore with Ma, you would see all kinds of people come up to her and kiss her and hug her. People would look at us and say “I love your mother” with a deep sincerity. She had a magic propensity to make friends, and people instantly became infatuated with her. We all recognized that Ma was remarkable. She was full of life, full of light, positivity and a wittiness that would catch you off guard and crack you up. She was the kind of mother, or grandmother, you would brag about. I sure did. She lived on her own in a condominium. She was 94 years old and did whatever she wanted to do. If you were to speak with her on the phone, the strength in her voice belied her age. My grandmother was a badass, and thus was born one of her nicknames. “Badass.”

In her lifetime, she managed to travel the globe. We have beautiful pictures and hilarious videos of her from Stonehenge, to the black forest in Germany, from lunch in the Effiel tower and the silk road in Turkey. She was an avid cruiser and a gifted loser-of-sunglasses. Who cares!

She had a social calendar many would be envious of with her girls. She liked game nights playing Rummikub and loved the real thing even more – at the Borgata. She radiated comfort and love and care as the matriarch of our family. Her food was the best. Nothing rivaled her brisket and bow ties, her cucumber salad, her spaghetti and meatballs, her stuffed cabbage, or her Italian chicken. The first time she made me a corned beef sandwich with potato salad stuffed inside my world was rocked. That was and still stands as the best sandwich I’ve ever had. Wrapped in tinfoil as a to-go meal, it was prepared with love that was palpable.

We all love Ma to the ends of the earth. She was a daily staple in our lives. We tried to show her the same respect she showed her parents. We would do anything for her and we know she would do anything for us.

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